Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) book. Happy reading Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Pocket Guide.


Product description

If I had just read this section, I'd give it five stars, no doubt. Dante is escorted by the poet Virgil, who made a fantastic guide. Virgil was funny, witty and knowledgeable. He often made jokes about Dante passing out from horror, or ignored him once or twice to chat with other poets he encountered on the journey. He also wasn't afraid to rush Dante along, which came off as if Virgil was just bored by the deep horrors he was exposing Dante to.

Match that with the old-timey language of the time, and Virgil is just hilarious. The structure of Inferno is the most rigid and well-defined of the three sections. The reader sees Dante and Virgil escorted over Styx and facing such mythological creatures as minotaur, devils, Cerberus, and Nimrod on their descent. Dante really got imaginative and detailed with the sins and how they were punished. He really had creative licence with this section, and it showed well.

The first circle, for virtuous pagans where Virgil resides normally , seemed pretty chill, all things considered. The often intellectual shades who were "doomed" there were sentenced to spend the rest of time more or less bored, sighing and "not having the hope of knowing Christ. The remaining sinners aren't so fortunate, as their punishments are much more severe. Dante witnesses the lustful being swirled around by the winds of their uncontrollable desire, those who died by suicide transformed into trees that are torn apart by harpies, some wade in a river of shit, others are encased in ice.

Soothsayers have their heads forced backwards for looking "too far to the future" in life.

Portuguese Biscoitos recipe

Others are stuffed into flaming sarcophagi with thousands of others, with only their feet exposed, away from the fire. In one particularly memorable circle, the sinners are savagely dismembered and forced to walk around like that until their wounds heal, so the devil in charge of that circle can slice them off again. One sinner in this circle was flayed right down the middle with his entrails spilling out, and another spoke to Dante with his head completely severed and held in his own hand like a lantern. The mental image and clarity of these punishments are very detailed and well thought out, and are far and away the most engaging part of the whole book.

I particularly loved the Malebolge. Another high point of Inferno is all the famous people Dante encounters. Saladin, Cleopatra, Medusa, and many others all get name-dropped. Dante makes an effort to speak to at least one person, well known or otherwise, in every circle, and they share their pains with him. One of the most memorable for me was Ugolino, who sought revenge on his captor after the captor imprisoned him with his sons and implicitly drove him to cannibalize them.

Most of the people Dante encounter having equally interesting, if not as tragic, tales as Ugolino. There's also several corrupt popes included in Inferno, which I thought was a nice touch. And of course, Satan himself makes an appearance, looking rather dull and bored as he chews on Cassius.

Once Dante and Virgil climb down Satan's back and head out to Purgatorio, the book could've ended, and it would've stopped on such a high note. So we end up going through Purgatorio, and the book instantly begins to feel like a waste of time. To be fair, I'm pagan and wasn't brought up Catholic, so my working knowledge of the religion is limited, and I reckon someone with more knowledge on the topic could get more out of Purgatorio and Paradiso and probably enjoy it more for that reason.

But all things considered, there's really no reason for Dante and Virgil to spend so much time being lost and asking for help. Sure, neither one really knew which way to go, but I felt like this was drawn out and made such a big deal and it just wasn't interesting. Like its a mountain ffs, find a slope and start climbing?

Find a copy in the library

Most people here spent time marveling at how cool Dante is because he's living, which means his form blocks the sun and casts a shadow, which they find badass, so badass it gets repeated like times. Virgil kicks it with one of his poet friends and joins him to the group, often walking and talking with him and leaving Dante the dude he was divinely ordained to escort kind of lagging behind in the dust. The theme of Purgatorio is that the shades there are supposed to cast out their seven deadly sins to become pure enough to enter heaven. Which sounds cool and all, except it ends up being a discounted version of Inferno, where people are being punished for the exact same sins less severely.

Again, this is where I scratch my head but a working knowledge of the concept of graces and such in Catholicism would really come in useful right here. Like in one part, the envious have a wire sewing their eyes shut so they can't see things to be jealous of.

I get it, but I thought Purgatorio would be more hands-on, with the deceased actively contemplating and thinking about what they did wrong, feeling genuinely sorry and showing a sincere effort and desire to improve. But nah, its just waiting in a really long delayed line. With an obtuse punishment limiting you because retribution. Dante and Virgil also couldn't move easily around the mountain, not because it was steep, just because.

See a Problem?

They also couldn't advance to another circle during nighttime, just because. I had a harder time understanding Purgatorio and Paradiso, the language was much less clear, so there's a chance its explained and I just glossed right over it. Dante and Virgil get escorted by a giant hawk up the mountain at one point.

Its also just kinda He looks back at Virgil, who smiles at him, then blah blah blah, Beatrice starts whining because Dante doesn't love her as much as he says he does bitch, you're dead and a purity sue, literally what does it matter?

bromittebomo.ga/the-hunter-the-hunted-and-the-prey.php

Free Online Books Eneida Com Notas Portuguese Edition Mobi

And I'm honestly pressed, because Virgil was the realest, baddest daddy in the whole book. So Queen of Goodness, love of his life, sunshine of his eyes he says that about her at one point, srs comes to take him to Heaven and the book gets supremely shitty because a whole lot of nothing happens and there's literally no point to heaven at all other than for Dante to wank super hard to Beatrice. Worst female character ever just smiles a lot and says vague things and Dante marvels at how beautiful and perfect and pure she is for nine spheres.

At the end, he even places her besides Rebecca and Sarah from the Bible. That's how fucking obsessed with this chick he was. Like, I hate to break it to ya bud but she probably wasn't shit. Anyway, it seems like angels do literally absolutely nothing but make weird interpretive dance type shapes with their bodies all day they form a giant hawk and later a big white rose for Dante's amusement, I guess?

A Divina Comédia [Ilustrado] [Com notas e índice ativo] by Dante Alighieri (2 star ratings)

The spheres aren't arranged the way Inferno and even Purgatorio were, there's not one section for the humble believer building up to the archangels, there's not a sphere for the selfless and another for the deeply charitable, etc. I was expecting the nine spheres to contrast with Inferno's nine circles but it was just a whole lot of nothing, with angels of all rank and caliber mindlessly singing their praises onto god and standing in their weird angel hawk rose shapes.

Then the book ends. Beatrice smiles at Dante a couple of times, he witnesses "the love that moves the sun and stars" God and co and thats it. He doesn't describe getting back down to earth. He doesn't describe much of what he's learned. He sat through pages and pages of random holy people's "discourses" on topics that were boring and not relevant to anything going on just so Dante could pad the work and have 33 even cantos.

I know at this time period 14th century much artistic work was commissioned by the church. But the tragedy is that Dante had such imagination and voice with Inferno and then had to dilute it to "God is great, here's pages of me repeating that with no reasoning or justification as to why I believe that.

He also comments once that he can't look at Beatrice because her smile would smite him to ashes it's so beautiful and she's too ethereal and heavenly or some shit. Inferno is definitely a brilliant work, and its not surprising, although a bit sad, that just that section carried the whole Divine Comedy into classic status. At the time of its publication, I'm sure these types of criticisms weren't as common, given the religious might of the time period.

But even Purgatorio and Paradiso had so much potential that just got wasted. It really is a shame, because it's not like Dante couldn't write well or tell an engaging story.


  • Customers who bought this item also bought.
  • Eneida by Virgilio on Apple Books.
  • iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.?
  • Get A Copy.

The last two sections of the book feel stifled by what I assume was religious expectation that just got watered down to generic "Praise God! About 10 years ago, my husband and I planned to read Dante's Inferno together as a "bookclub" read while he was deployed.

Product details

It is one of my husband's all time favorites. I never finished it, thus my selection of it for this task. I initially intended to only read the Inferno, but given that the Inferno is obviously such a one-sided view of Dante's vision, I decided to finish the work. I have to be h Read Harder I definitely feel this would be best read in a Medieval Literature and Poetry course with a professor and a group of classmates to discuss.

So my 2 star review is heavily influenced by this limitation. That being said, my husband has always read this book on his own without any professor or class. I think the best thing that came out of reading this book for me was discussing with my husband why he enjoyed it so much and hearing how his perspective has changed over the years. And that may very well be the intention of this task in the challenge. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. View all 3 comments. This has left me so confused, half way through i realised I was reading the illustrated version so perhaps without the photos I was reading the kindle version the text didn't make much sense.

At some point I will have to read the full version to get the full meaning from this book. Peklo - supr, Ocistec - uz to zacinalo skripat, Raj - hruza: Al final no fue tan torturador pero tampoco es mi tipo de libro. Well, I listed to it, but I'm not sure how much I got out of it. It was full of references to Italians, politics and people that were beyond me to relate to. Culture changes a lot in years. I got a few tidbits out of the trips through hell, purgatory and heaven, but disagree with a lot of the basic principles.

I like the quote "that which deceives also reveals". When satan tries to tempt us and we recognize and resist the temptation it can reveal that we're on the right path and what our wea Well, I listed to it, but I'm not sure how much I got out of it. When satan tries to tempt us and we recognize and resist the temptation it can reveal that we're on the right path and what our weaknesses are that might get us off that path. I'm sure there's greatness here, but it would take a lot of history and research to properly appreciate it. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study.

The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied. The E-mail Address es field is required. Please enter recipient e-mail address es. The E-mail Address es you entered is are not in a valid format. Please re-enter recipient e-mail address es. You may send this item to up to five recipients. The name field is required. Please enter your name. The E-mail message field is required. Please enter the message. Please verify that you are not a robot. Would you also like to submit a review for this item?

You already recently rated this item. Your rating has been recorded. Write a review Rate this item: Preview this item Preview this item. Eneida Maria de Souza Publisher: Humanitas Belo Horizonte, Brazil , Enabled Amazon Best Sellers Rank: Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. Eneida [com notas] Portuguese Edition. Set up a giveaway. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Learn more about Amazon Prime. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime. Get to Know Us. English Choose a language for shopping. Amazon Music Stream millions of songs.

Amazon Advertising Find, attract, and engage customers.

Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)
Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)
Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)
Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)
Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)
Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition) Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)

Related Eneida [com notas] (Portuguese Edition)



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved